Something Old, Something New

Simply Civics Brookline Bell

Like many Brookline and Boston apartments, our building is kind of old. We may complain that the heater doesn’t always work in the winter. But that’s part of the charm of living in a historic town– especially in New England.

Some buildings in Brookline are actually located in historic districts, a designation that comes with many implications for residents.

I went to my first Brookline Preservation Commission hearing on Monday night.

Luckily for me, it began with an overview of the hearing process and the task of the Commission. In brief, here’s his overview in a nutshell: The Commission is charged with enforcing both the Demolition Bylaw and the Historic District Bylaw. As I learned throughout the hearing, it’s no walk in the park.

Historical Significance

To start, if a homeowners applies for a demolition permit (or partial demolition), the Commission has to determine whether the building or garage is historically significant. According to the By-Laws, section 5.3.5, a building is historically significant if it’s:

  1. Located within any Local Historic District;
  2. Listed on or is within a area listed on the National or State Registers of Historic Places; is eligible for listing on the National or State Registers of historic places; or is a building for which a preliminary determination of eligibility has been made by the Massachusetts Historical Commission;
  3. Associated with one or more significant historic persons or events, or with the broad architectural, cultural, political, economic, or social history of the Town or Commonwealth; or
  4. Historically or architecturally significant in terms of its period, style, method of building construction, or its association with a significant architect or building, either by itself or as part of a group of buildings.

If a building meets any of the four criteria, it’s considered historically significant and therefore the owner can’t demolish it. The Commission isn’t supposed to take into account any plans for after demolition, so they aren’t really supposed to ask what the property owners intend to build.

Permits Up for Debate

The Commission took up seven demolition cases at the hearing, ranging from garage demolition permits to full home demolition permits. Each time, we watched a powerpoint with pictures of the houses from different vantage points, including aerial views. We heard a lot about the history of each property and the original architects. I absolutely fell in love with one of the houses and I would move into it in a heartbeat if I could.

The Commission members discussed the architects’ legacies, the architectural styles, the materials and foundation of each house, the surrounding neighborhoods, and what a passersby could see from the street. They debated the very meaning of historical significance, and the extent of their power as a Commission.

As I listened to the homeowners, their reasons for demolition surprised me. A lot of their testimony was very personal and moving, involving aging parents, or houses sitting on the market without buyers.

As you may imagine, since the houses are historic, some of them are, well…very old. Therefore, architects did not build them to support today’s lifestyle.

For example, a Commission member described one house as “gorgeous but not livable.” Because this particular house had electrical heating, the homeowner pays about $1000 per month for heating in the winter. Similarly, in another case, engineers had deemed a garage unsafe because the roof was caving in. Under these circumstances, the family can’t park cars inside it because it’s too risky. They don’t want their daughter anywhere near it.

Preservation or Demolition?

Ultimately, the Commission approved some of the demolition permits. It’s sad. For one thing, some of the most endeared New England architects designed those houses. Each home tells its own unique story. As I learned, it’s not easy to parse out the most “historically significant” few homes from the many. Indeed, each house or neighborhood contributes its own character to the Brookline community.

I’ll surprise my family with these words…But sometimes change can be good. Especially when a little change can make a home much safer, environmentally-friendly, and livable.

The Commission and residents approached each case with such respectful dialogue. Throughout the hearing, they walked a careful line, to preserve our history yet be open to change when necessary.

As they walked out of Town Hall on Monday night, some of the residents had a go-ahead to pursue demolition. Others will be back next month or next year to apply for a permit again. In essence, this is the local democratic process–slow and steady.

To hear about future Brookline Preservation Commission meetings or hearings, subscribe to alerts here.

To end, I’ll share some wisdom from William Murtagh, the first keeper of the National Register of Historic Places.

“It has been said that, at its best, preservation engages the past in a conversation with the present over a mutual concern for the future.”

Sometimes a little change goes a long way.

Augmented Reality, Nextdoor

Simply Civics Nextdoor

As you’ve probably heard, Pokemon Go went viral this week. A quick Google search will show you all about the phenomenon. The game uses augmented reality technology and GPS tracking to superimpose Pokemon in the real world. As a result, players tend to congregate in public places (parks, beaches, etc.) to find and capture more Pokemon.

In the spirit of getting out in the community, I’m going to share an app I’ve used for the past couple weeks. It’s called Nextdoor: the free private social media for your neighborhood. This isn’t just for Bostonians. Actually, it’s all over the country.

Couches & Public Hearings

Nextdoor is like a local version of Facebook. I’ve seen people post for a variety of reasons. To illustrate, my neighbors recently posted about these topics and more:

  • Upcoming Town Hall meetings and public hearings
  • Does the cat that stops by to eat have a home?
  • A free couch
  • Babysitters and nannies

Actually, my roommate and I went to check out the aforementioned couch. We would’ve gladly taken it. However, we couldn’t figure out how to get it into our apartment before the date our neighbor moved away.

Each day, there’s a lot of activity on the feed, with neighbors posting and commenting. In fact, just yesterday, another neighbor posted to ask for input on research she and a friend are conducting.

Plus, Nextdoor is user-friendly and has some pretty cool features. For instance, my favorite feature is an option to “thank” your neighbor for their post. A little gratitude goes a long way!

Signing up for Nextdoor

It takes a minute to sign up. First, you can either access it on your favorite web browser or download the app. When joining the network, you just have to enter your address and then verify it. Then, it will tell you which neighborhood you belong to. Believe it or not, I didn’t know my neighborhood had a name until I signed up. It’s a lot easier to become an active member of my neighborhood now that I know what it’s called!

So, check it out and see what your neighbors are talking about. You wouldn’t want to miss out on some important community conversations.

Nextdoor transcends the digital world to bring community members together. Maybe it’s another type of augmented reality…one that doesn’t use up quite as much phone data.

July 4th Reflections

Simply Civics July 4th

I look forward to July 4th weekend each year. This year, I spent a lot of the weekend outside on the South Shore with friends: breathing in the fresh air, grilling hot dogs and hamburgers, seeing the American flag fly boldly in the breeze, and at the end of each day, watching in awe as the sun set on the water. I loved spending quality time with my friends and enjoying what makes summertime so magical.

Monday Night

Back in Brookline on Monday evening, I paused to reflect on my weekend. I perused through my Facebook feed and Twitter, and I was deeply moved by how many people had taken the time to post excerpts from the Declaration of Independence.

One of my friends in particular took a creative approach. He wrote the first line of the Declaration of Independence as his status, and then invited his friends to add each consecutive line of the document as comments. Together, they were rebuilding the document. I read each comment, allowing each revolutionary line to ruminate in my mind.

“When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation…”

At 10:15PM, after reading through these posts, I left my apartment and walked towards Corey Hill on Summit Ave. I had read in the Brookline TAB that the Boston Esplanade fireworks were visible from Corey Hill Park and Larz Anderson Park, and decided to see how Brookline celebrates the 4th.

Fireworks

I expected to see a small crowd at Corey Hill Park.

Instead, the hill was packed with community members of all ages. I couldn’t quite tell where to stand. I stumbled through the grass in the darkness, trying to avoid tripping on tree roots. A few minutes after 10:30, I noticed everyone shifting to the left side of the park, and I thought maybe they were packing up to leave. In effect, I resigned to the idea that perhaps I had missed the whole show. Next year, I’ll leave my apartment a little earlier and maybe even picnic on the grass.

But I walked towards the crowd and turned towards the Boston city skyline. As my eyes rested on the bright sky, I smiled. Through the trees, we could indeed see the whole show. It was breathtaking.

I stood there, captivated by the energy of the community around me. It was amazing. Many Brookliners ventured up a hill to a park on Monday night to watch the Boston fireworks in between trees. July 4th truly is a special tradition.

240th Birthday

July 4th fireworks carry so much meaning. Two hundred and forty years since the Declaration of Independence, we continue to celebrate. Each year, we gather with our friends, family, and community to reflect on what unites us. Through our celebrations, we renew our dedication to democracy.

“It’s the finale!” I heard a woman nearby say. People were clapping, amazed by the incredible show.

I looked around Corey Hill Park, thankful for the tradition that brings us together as a community. There has been a lot of troubling news around the world, near and far. To pave the way for our brighter future, I think we should reflect on the vision that first brought us together as a country.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Thank you to the many diverse communities of Americans who have carried the torch of liberty and pursued these truths through challenging times. Thank you in advance to those who will carry the torch into the future.

Happy Independence Day to you and your loved ones.

Happy birthday, America, and I hope this next year is one of freedom, peace, and unity.

Jane Jacobs & River Road

Simply Civics

25 Washington Street, Brookline

Boston Urban Analysis was one of my favorite undergraduate classes at Boston College. It was an elective offered through PULSE, the academic service-learning program at BC. David Manzo, the course instructor, taught us about what makes an urban community, particularly Boston, thrive. We spent the second half of the semester downtown, walking the sidewalks of Boston and seeing for ourselves how residential, commercial, and public spaces interplay in a city.

Jane Jacobs’ book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, was a pillar of the Urban Analysis curriculum. I highly recommend that you add it to your summer civic reading list. If you read it, or have read it, let me know because I’d love to hear your thoughts!

To begin with, Jacobs’ book was a reaction to rationalist urban planning policies in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly those implemented by Robert Moses in New York City. She was a leader of community-based urban planning. Here’s a link to the 1961 New York Times book review.

To break it down, Jacobs wrote about the 4 generators of diversity in an urban neighborhood:

  • Mixed primary uses;
  • Short blocks;
  • Buildings of various ages; and
  • Density of people.

Two years after first reading the book, Jacobs’ ideas still resonate with me. I’ve been thinking about what they would mean for an urban community like Brookline, which is not very diverse but which I believe should aspire to be in the future.

With these four generators in mind, I walked into the River Road Study Committee Public Hearing on Monday night in Brookline Town Hall.

Planning Parcels

River Road is next to where Route 9 and Brookline Ave meet. With the Emerald Necklace and Jamaicaway to the east and Brookline Village to the west, River Road is an awkwardly shaped, narrow “island” with a few commercial properties. Here’s a map so you can visualize the area. I find its odd shape really fascinating.

To put it simply, Brookline is considering rezoning the area for redevelopment. Claremont Corporation purchased a parcel of the district, 25 Washington Street, with the intention of building a hotel on the corner of Brookline Ave and Washington Street. Currently, the Zoning By-Law doesn’t permit a hotel on the parcel, so the town is looking at options for a zoning overlay. Basically, a zoning overlay is a special zoning district, where a town can adopt specific provisions in the zoning for a specified area.http://www.bc.edu/schools/cas/pulse.html

Constraints & Opportunities

As Brookline considers redevelopment, the ommittee and the Planning Department are facing a few constraints. First, there just so happens to be existing stores and businesses on the parcel. Next, there is a storm water easement in the middle of the “island.” Third, the land happens to be in a FEMA flood zone. Fourth, the building height is capped at 40 feet. Furthermore, planning for parking ramps has proven to be immensely challenging. All this being said, there are enormous opportunities to redevelop the property.

Picture this: enhanced pedestrian amenities, storefronts, and new residential properties, landscaped with sidewalk trees and grass inspired by the nearby Emerald Necklace.

Massing Models & Schemes

Developing it will be a challenge, but the committee and interested town residents seem committed to the project’s success.

Throughout the meeting, I listened to members of the committee and representatives from Claremont cover a lot of ground in their presentations. They talked about current market conditions and other financial feasibility factors, the capitalization rates on the parcel, draft overlay zoning, the landscape plans and massing models, architectural schemes, and next steps to the plan. The massing models looked pretty neat!

I had never before seen people so consumed by parking plans. Parking is a hot issue in Brookline. By statute, every residential unit must have two parking spaces. (Quick note: at two of the three community events I’ve attended, people have brought up the idea of revisiting this statute at the next Town Meeting. We’ll see!)  Since there is an easement in the middle of the “island,” the committee has had to think strategically and creatively. Therefore, they’re plotting out where to position parking ramps, how many floors of parking there should be, whether a hotel  could share parking with other commercial properties on the parcel, etc. It sounds like they’ve come up with a solution that works with the space. I’ll trust the experts on this one!

To conclude the presentation, representatives from Claremont presented schemes of the proposed hotel. I personally liked a scheme where the height of the building drops off towards the Emerald Necklace. The tallest part of the hotel would be at the corner of Brookline Avenue and Washington Street. That’s just my preference!

What would Jacobs think?

After the presentation, the committee opened the hearing up to public comment. It was really heartwarming to hear from residents about their priorities in the area. This is where Jane Jacobs comes in.

To recap, Jane Jacobs wrote about 4 generators of diversity: mixed primary use, short blocks, buildings of various ages, and density of people.

From what I gathered during public comment, Brookline residents want to see mixed uses along River Road. They want a mix of residential and commercial properties, and possibly a hotel with an outdoor cafe. Also, they want a high density of people, diverse businesses, and green space.

Next, the streets in Brookline aren’t laid out in a grid, so the short blocks idea doesn’t really apply in this case. However, Jacobs wrote a lot about wide sidewalks. That was certainly a focus of the meeting. To the extent possible, the sidewalks will be wide and lined with trees. One resident proposed having a gelato café on the parcel. That would be lovely!

I would venture to guess that Jacobs would probably have some concerns with the redevelopment, though. She would ask what will happen to the businesses already there. Will they be included in the project? This committee has thus far proven to be very collaborative, both in tone and in gathering public input, so I hope this will continue to be the case.

Key Tenets

Not only has the committee been collaborative, but so have the residents. The residents have expressed a genuine interest in seeing the project succeed and fit the character of Brookline. The public comments on Monday were very thoughtful. Again and again, I heard residents thank the committee for all the work they’ve done so far.

The types of questions residents posed were really productive and rigorous, too. In other words, they put the committee and Claremont to the test. How can the plan enhance the nearby cycling path? Also, will the café be a spot that local residents will want to go to, or just guests of the hotel? What will happen to the existing users on the property? Will there be more traffic? How will we support Brookline’s portion of the Emerald Necklace through this project?

Actually, cherishing the Emerald Necklace was a major theme. The Emerald Necklace is a string of parks through Boston and Brookline. The thinnest part of the Necklace happens to be in Brookline, right next to the River Road parcel.

Throughout their productive comments, the residents taught me some pretty valuable tenets of civic engagement. Briefly, I learned that in order to effect policy locally:

  1. Get to know the character of your town,
  2. Show up to meetings,
  3. Voice your perspective, and
  4. Collaborate with others to build a vision.

next Steps

If you’re interested in learning more about the River Road project, here’s the committee site. Once the minutes from Monday’s meeting are approved, those and the presentations will be posted on the site.

I’ll share a tip I learned the other day, too, for getting and staying involved in Brookline. To hear about future meetings, subscribe to the committee alerts here. You can choose which committees and boards to subscribe to. I may have subscribed to many committees already….

Someday in the near future, I could be one of those active residents who contributes meaningfully at a public hearing through public comment. You can also in your own community!

The River Road Study Committee has accomplished a lot the past 5 months. It’ll be interesting to see how the project progresses. Soon there could be a hotel, businesses, apartments, and who knows, maybe a gelato café!

Unpacking Health Care Policy

Simply Civics

The Honorable Michael Dukakis

The third floor of the Brookline Senior Center was packed last Wednesday night. Brookliners gathered for the 20th Annual Public Health Policy Forum, presented by the Friends of Brookline Public Health and Brookline Adult & Community Education. The theme was: “Celebrating 20 Years of Advocating for Health Care Reform: Looking Back, Looking Forward.”

I barely found a seat!

The event began with welcoming remarks from the co-founders of Friends of Brookline Public Health: Alan Balsam, PhD, MPH, the Director of Brookline Public Health & Human Services; and J. Jacques Carter, MD.

Dr. Carter introduced the night’s moderator, the Honorable Michael Dukakis.

You may not know that former Governor Dukakis is a Brookline native. He started his public service career as a Brookline Town Meeting Member and was elected to the Massachusetts Legislature in 1962. He served three terms as Governor of Massachusetts, first from 1975-1979 and then again from 1983-1991. During that time, he was the Democratic Party nominee for President of the United States in the 1988 elections. And he’s from Brookline!

The panelists

I sat in awe as former Governor Dukakis introduced the panelists.  Each of the panelists has contributed so much to the field of public health through their respective careers.

  • Dr. Judy Ann Bigby served as the Commonwealth’s Secretary of Health and Human Services from 2007 to 2013. She was responsible for implementing many aspects of the 2006 health care reform law. She is currently a Senior Fellow with Mathematica Policy Research, located in Cambridge.
  • Amy Whitcomb Slemmer is the Executive Director of Health Care for All in Massachusetts. Health Care for All is a “nonprofit advocacy organization working to create a health care system that provides comprehensive, affordable, accessible, and culturally competent care to everyone, especially the most vulnerable among us.” (HCFA website).
  • Dolores Mitchell recently retired as Executive Director of the Group Insurance Commission after 29 years of service! The GIC provides health-related services to the Commonwealth’s employees, retirees and their dependents, municipalities, and other entities. Congratulations to Ms. Mitchell on her 29 years of service to the Commonwealth!
  • John McDonough is the Professor of Public Health Practice, Department of Health Policy & Management, at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He served as the Senior Advisor on National Health Reform to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. He worked on both the writing and passage of the Affordable Care Act.

As Governor Dukakis pointed out, three of the four panelists were women!

A brief health policy primer

Throughout the forum, the panelists discussed the dimensions of public health policy in recent years and the challenges that lie ahead.

In 2006, Massachusetts passed a health care reform bill guaranteeing coverage to most residents of the Commonwealth. As Dr. Bigby explained, 500,000 people gained insurance in 2006, many of whom had previously struggled the most to get health care.

Four years later, in 2010, President Obama and Congress passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Among other statutes, it mandated health insurance coverage for all Americans.

Where we are now

Today, many more Americans are insured. Consequently, fewer individuals find themselves financially bankrupted by medical crises. Plus, more Americans are receiving preventative medical care. Since 2010, Massachusetts has had the smallest increase in health care costs yet.

It’s not as simple as that, though. Mandated health insurance isn’t a one and done deal, and not everyone is in agreement about whether it’s the right solution.

The best way for us to develop informed opinions is through learning more about it. I’ll be the first to say my knowledge of the Affordable Care Act is just about a drop in the bucket of what the law entails. However, that’s one of the great aspects of attending an event like this. It exposed me to many aspects of health care reform, and then prompted me to do some more research on my own.

To learn more about the Affordable Care Act, check out the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website. It has the full text and a guide with key features of the law.

Costs

One of the pressing issues right now, the panelists explained, is figuring out how to reign in the costs of our complex health care system. Medication prices are going up, which means the cost of care is also increasing.

Rising health care costs affect everyone: consumers, families, health insurance companies, medical practices, and hospitals.

Leaders have proposed reform in this area, particularly at the state level. Massachusetts State Senator Mark Montigny (D) sponsored Senate Bill 1048, An Act to promote transparency and cost control of pharmaceutical drug prices. You can follow the bill’s progress here.

Participating in policy

Because we live in a democracy, we each have a say in the future of our health care system. In fact, we can participate in our national policy discussions.

It’s important for each of us to be informed and to communicate our views and ideas to our elected officials, both at the state and national level.

If you’re interested in following cost control initiatives at the state level, the legislature has a Joint Committee on Health Care Financing. You can track bills and attend hearings.

Lastly, be in touch with your elected officials! They want to hear from their constituents about where they stand. Massachusetts residents, you can find your state legislators here.

Looking ahead

We know that the health care system is complex. The participants, speakers, and panelists at the forum brought up issues that impact all of us, wherever we live across the city, country, or world.

However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t sustainable and high-quality solutions out there. If we think boldly, we can both support the world-class medical system in America and bring down costs.

I wonder what updates the panelists will share this time next year at the 21st Annual Public Health Policy Forum.

Zoning for All

Simply Civics

I went to my first community meeting last night! It was the fourth installment out of four Housing Production Plan Community Workshops in Brookline Town Hall.

Because I had missed the first three, I had a lot of catching up to do. I’ll summarize the situation briefly. Brookline is working with RKG Associates, JM Goldson, and the Metropolitan Area Planning Council to create a housing plan. The Commonwealth requires that at least 10% of each town or city’s housing is affordable. Affordable means that residents don’t spend more than 30% of their income on housing.

Brookline is under the 10% benchmark, and it has work to do. In Brookline:

  • 1/5 of households spend more than 50% of their income on housing;
  • 1/2 of households with low/moderate-income spend more than 50% of their income on housing; and
  • For renters, 3/4 of households with low/moderate-income spend more than 50% of their income.

Those numbers are truly staggering. The housing market is actually pushing individuals and families out of Brookline.

What’s exciting, though, is that there was a big turnout last night of concerned members of the community. For the most part, they want to see more affordable housing units. They want the people who are currently living in affordable housing to be able to keep their housing, and they want people who do not have affordable options to find them in Brookline. The question is: how?

The Brookline Planning Board, Housing Advisory Board, RKG Associates, and JM Goldson proposed draft strategies. There were four buckets of strategies: Regulatory, Resource Allocation, Education & Advocacy (my favorite), and Local Policy & Planning. I’m not familiar with Brookline zoning laws, but from what I gathered, they are complicated and are probably in need of some serious updating.

I tried my best to keep up with the presentation. What is Chapter 40B? What’s a Zoning Overlay District? What are all these buildings the presenters are referring to? I felt clueless and uninformed. At least I’m only here to gather information and learn, I thought.

Wrong.

We broke out into groups and rotated through four tables, one for each topic. Each person had to speak once before anyone could speak twice. I couldn’t hide. I had no option but to participate.

Facilitators asked us for our feedback on each strategy. Should we promote the use of 40B on appropriate sites for development or redevelopment? That sounds right, I thought. Do we want to prioritize building more affordable housing units or renovating the ones we already have? Can’t we do both? Should we raise taxes, divert funding from social programs, or provide incentives for developers to build renewable units in Brookline? Should we take land away from parks and open spaces to build new housing? Definitely not (Channeling my inner Leslie Knope from Parks and Rec.) The parks contribute a lot to Brookline’s character.

We spent 80 minutes debating, proposing, considering, refuting, inferring….

My head was spinning.

I felt like I was back in college, only this time, the stakes were a lot higher. My thoughts were actually being recorded and I was contributing to the Housing Production Plan for my town. This plan is going to impact housing development, financing, and sustainability for years to come. I was reminded that not only do we have to plan for Brookline today, but we must consider the future, too. We need to think critically about how to promote smart and sustainable housing policy for generations to come. As a millennial at the meeting, I represented the future generations of Brookliners.

As the meeting came to an end, the facilitators stood up and presented on the themes that had come up during the discussions. There seemed to be consensus around a lot of strategies, but also some disagreement about others. Some participants even had suggestions for potential community partnerships to expand affordable housing options.

The revised plan will be submitted to the Board of Selectmen in July. Updates should be posted on the HPP site.

We adjourned at 9:15, but the discussion is far from over. To provide input in the production plan process, submit your thoughts and/or questions here. It’s a tangible step we each can take to ensure Brookline’s affordability for years to come.

If you’re interested in participating in future community meetings, visit the Brookline calendar. There’s something going on almost everyday!

 

Freakonomics & Why We Follow the News

I listen to NPR One regularly…probably daily. If you haven’t checked it out already, download it from your App store. It’s an audio app that streams NPR news and programs based on your interests. I hear newscast clips from the Boston area and programs from across the country. If you hear one you don’t like, you can skip it. It’s similar to Pandora in that way. To be honest though, I don’t think I’ve skipped anything before. It’s that good.

I stumbled upon an interesting Freakonomics Radio rebroadcast the other day, called  Why Do We Really Follow the News?

Do we follow the news because we find it entertaining? We enjoy following sports, music, arts, fashion, etc, in the news. I personally find the Today Show entertaining. That’s not really what the podcast is getting at though.

I would argue that following the news, particularly when it comes to politics and the community, is not about entertainment. We grow through connecting with others. We feel compassion for others. We want to be informed of what’s going on down the street from us, and across the world from us, because it matters to us. When we’re more informed, and when we can relate to others through news, we thrive together in our local, national, and global communities.

Listen to the episode and let me know what you think!

 

Ben & Jerry’s

Ben and Jerrys

I was listening to one of my favorite podcasts the other day, Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me. As it never fails to do, it got me thinking. I started wondering about how much politics and the news industry have changed with social media and technology. Has community life changed too? Do we engage civically in 2016 the same ways we did in 2006? 1996? 1986?

I’m willing to bet ten pints of Ben & Jerry’s Americone Dream that today in 2016, we can find new ways to build connectedness in our communities, nationwide, and globally.

And so, I’ve started this blog.

I’m writing about my civic adventures in Brookline and Boston, and I’m inviting you to join me wherever you are.

There are so many opportunities for civic engagement.

We can vote, support candidates, and run for office. We can read, watch, and follow the news. We can listen to podcasts.

We can attend town or city events, or meet our neighbors at block parties. We can read about our local history. We can serve fellow community members through soup kitchens and clothing drives. We can explore and clean our parks and public spaces.

We can debate and dream boldly with our friends, family, and strangers.

That’s just the beginning.

I’m going on a journey to discover the virtues and vulnerabilities of living fully in our democratic society. I’ll share my path, and I hope that together we’ll find limitless possibilities. Wherever you are in your career, schooling, or life, there is a way to exercise your role as a citizen.

Civic engagement is more than just voting. It’s being present and active in our communities.

I’m excited to begin. Will you join me?

I’d love any ideas so please feel free to leave comments or email me. We’ll see where this goes!