Civic Moving Hacks

 

So, your boxes are unpacked and you’ve made your requisite trips to Target, IKEA, the hardware store, etc. You’ve scoped out the nearby take-out restaurants, the closest pharmacy, and public transportation options. You even set up mail forwarding (or purposely didn’t set up mail forwarding, to throw off all the mass-mail marketing companies).

Congrats! Now that your move is over, you can forget about the horror of squeezing a couch in a small stairwell, and focus on a great adventure ahead.

Wherever you now reside, it’s time to join your new community.

I’ve put together a Simply Civics guide for community essentials, because like you, I hope to survive September 1st, and like you, I’m excited to see what’s going on around me ASAP. Now is the time to flex your civic muscles.  Even if you’re not moving, now is a great time to focus on your community.

Without further ado…

Joining a Community: The Moving Edition

  1. Visit your Town Hall. Say hey! Get comfortable so that when you have to pick up an absentee ballot or talk to the Community Planning Office, you know where to go. Check out the Town’s website to see what kind of meetings take place and where. Is there a big meeting room that you might go to for a local hearing? Does your School Committee or School Department have its own office? Where’s the Clerk’s Office located?
  2. While you’re at the Clerk’s Office, change your voter registration address. Do it now so you won’t have to scramble before the elections.
  3. Get a library card. Local libraries often assume to role of a community’s center. With a library card, you can check out books, but you can also use computers, take out e-books, reserve rooms, (in Brookline) check out library pans, reserve museum passes, attend classes, and conduct research. To get a library card, you will probably need a state-issued ID card, an identifying piece of mail, or a bank statement.
  4. Meet your neighbors. First, say hey to them outside or in your building, introduce yourself, and say which unit or building you’re in. Then, join NextDoor, a social media platform for your neighborhood. People post when they are trying to give something away, or looking for recommendations, or looking to hire a babysitter or pet sitter. It’s a great resource. To learn more about its many advantages, check out my post about NextDoor.
  5. Donate your duplicate furniture, appliances, clothes, etc., to a nearby organization where it can be put to better use. One excellent option is NuDay Syria. They have a number of drop-off locations listed on their website. See if any places of worship in your area are collecting household items/clothes/food for underserved families You could also consider posting on NextDoor to give away items to a neighbor.
  6. Subscribe to local news. Does your town or city have one or two major newspapers? Brookline has the TAB and Patch. Both are great and free. You’ll need to know what’s going on around you — upcoming initiatives, new shops and restaurants, winter weather how-to’s — and you might as well tune in now. Local news covers a lot of ground and is a great way to learn about your community.
  7. Mark your Calendar with Community-Wide Events. If you live or work in Brookline, mark your calendar now for Brookline Day. It’s on September 24 and it’s fun for all ages. I’ve been looking forward to it since last year’s Brookline Day. Your town might have holiday festivals, farmer’s markets, or even a Harvest Festival. Any Parks and Rec fans out theres?Pawnee Harvest Festival
  8. Get to know your public officials. This is a lot easier than it may seem. They’ll be listed on your town or city site. Many of them also have campaign websites, even outside of campaign season, so you can look up their priorities that way. While you’re doing this, pull up a map of your city or town to see if you’re in a specific precinct. You’ll need to know this come election time, but it’s great to know beforehand, too. Here’s Brookline’s precinct map. I’ll be changing precincts so I’ll have new Town Meeting Members.
  9. Follow your community on Twitter and other social media. I love this step. There are some public officials who post frequently and are very involved in town activities. Don’t be shy. They want you to follow them. Search for Twitter accounts for the library, schools, farmers markets, newspapers, art centers, transportation office, political organizations, the chamber of commerce, neighborhood services, etc. Some are better than others, but you can always unsubscribe at any time.
  10. Learn about Civic Organizations. There are so many out there, depending on your interests and availability. Talk to people to see what’s worthwhile and what would be up your alley. If you don’t have time to join one now, think about following their work and supporting them in your own way. Here are some ideas.

League of Women Voters. Talk to me if you’re interested in joining! Men are welcome, too!

Neighborhood Associations. Brookline has the Brookline Neighborhood Alliance and has specific neighborhood associations within it.

Town/City Political Parties. Political Parties always want more volunteers!

Town/City Working Groups and Committees. Brookline posts their openings here. Volunteering for a local board or committee is a fantastic way to serve your community.

School PTAs. I can’t really speak to this but if you have school-aged kids, you may think about this as a means to get to know other parents and get involved in the school.

Local Clubs. You’d be surprised what you can find with a quick Google search.

 

The Place to Start

Just like the process of moving, when it comes to joining a community, you can’t do it all at once. But there are some things you can do easily right off the bat.

Honestly, the list is far from exhaustive, but it’s a great starting point. Once you get the basics, you’ll be a community member in no time. Remember, there’s more to civic engagement than voting. At it’s core, civic engagement is about being active in civic life, and there are so many ways to do it. Find the ones that work best for you, and see where it takes you!

Since I’m a big fan of Chance the Rapper and I’ve had his version of the Arthur theme song (“Wonderful Everyday“) stuck in my head for days, I’m going to send you off with some words of wisdom from a good ol’ children’s show (random, but bear with me):

Everyday when you’re walking down the street, everybody that you meet
Has an original point of view
And I say HEY! hey! what a wonderful kind of day! 
Where you can learn to work and play
And get along with each other

You got to listen to your heart
Listen to the beat
Listen to the rhythm, the rhythm of the street
Open up your eyes, open up your ears
Get together and make things better by working together
It’s a simple message and it comes from the heart
Believe in yourself (echo: believe in yourself)
Well that’s the place to start (to start)

One last thing. If you Tweet a picture at @simplycivics of you doing any of these things in the next month, and tag #simplycivics, maybe I’ll write a blog post about you!

Happy Moving!

April Showers Bring May Elections

It’s election season again in Brookline, but it’s a lot different from this past November. This time, the people on the ballot are our neighbors.

For a lot of people, springtime means flowers, the Marathon, baseball, and eating lunch outside. For candidates for local office, springtime means campaigning is in full swing. Candidates are spending their evenings and weekends knocking on doors, stopping in at events, calling neighbors, asking for endorsements, and somehow getting enough sleep to function.

The issues this election season are monumental. Debates are centering around where to build the next K-8 school, how many more affordable housing units we should approve this year, whether it’s time for a debt exclusion, and what services our libraries will provide in the coming years. That’s not even all of it.

When Brookline residents go to the polls on Tuesday, May 2nd, they’ll be voting for town-wide offices and Town Meeting Members.

Contested

The Brookline Board of Selectmen, School Committee, Library Board of Trustees, and Town Meeting Members each have seats up for election this year. As a civic engagement nerd, I’m thrilled that there are more contested races this time than in previous years. That means more people want to get involved in our local government, which is fantastic news. The more, the merrier.

Since there are contested races, we each have some decisions to make. If we follow these simple steps, we’ll be ready to vote on May 2nd.

The 10 Steps to Voting Success

  1. Mark your calendar. Decide now whether you’ll vote in the morning, at lunch, in the afternoon, in the early evening. You can always change it later if your schedule shifts, but it’s important to have a reminder set. Polls will be open from 7:00AM to 8:00PM.
  2. Apply for an absentee ballot if you can’t vote on May 2nd.
  3. Check out a sample ballot for your precinct. They’re available on the Town website. Do you recognize any of the names?
  4. Read about the candidates. The Brookline TAB publishes a bunch of endorsements. Some of the candidates have websites where they spell out their positions on local issues.
  5. Attend candidate forums. The League of Women Voters of Brookline is hosting a forum for the candidates of town-wide office on Wednesday, April 26 at 6:30PM (refreshments at 6:00PM) in the Selectmen’s Hearing Room at Town Hall. Come hang out with the candidates and hear how and why they want to serve the community. The co-sponsors of the forum are the Brookline Neighborhood Alliance (BNA) and the Town Meeting Members Association (TMMA).
  6. Pick up the Voter’s Guide in the Brookline TAB, prepared by the League of Women Voters. Year after year, the League knocks this one out of the park. Shout out to Joel Shoner for putting it together!
  7. If a candidate knocks on your door, greet him or her with a smile. Then, ask them why they’re running and what they’d like to do if they get elected. Read the literature. Maybe you could take it a step further and canvass for a candidate yourself.
  8. If you still have questions for the candidates, ask them. It’s pretty easy to contact candidates. Plus, I’d be surprised if they don’t respond to you, because after all, they do want your vote. What’s unique about local elections is the candidates live in your community. You just don’t get that same accessibility with federal elections. Candidates for local office go to the same grocery stores as you, they take the Green Line with you. You can actually talk to them.
  9. Confirm your polling location. You want to show up at the right location.
  10. Vote! If you have children, bring them with you for a mini civics lesson.

There you have it. Ten is a nice round number. But I would be remiss if I said this list is exhaustive.

Even More Election Fun

Personally, I have some other Election Day traditions of my own. I channel my inner Leslie Knope and geek out about the democratic process.

Image result for parks and rec leslie knope democracy meme

(Gif cred: https://www.good.is/articles/leslie-knope-feminism)

Here are just a few extra activities you can do:

Listen to an Election Day playlist. Tweet about local issues. Reach out to your friends and family members and ask which candidates they support. Go to the BrooklineCAN forum on Monday, April 24 from 4:00PM-6:00PM at the Brookline Senior Center.

If you can swing it with your schedule, work at the polls! You’ll earn some cash, and more importantly, you’ll participate in the election process. It’s a truly moving experience to hand someone a ballot. Call the Brookline Clerk’s Office for more information: 617-730-2010.

See You at the Polls

As we often say in League of Women Voters events, democracy is not a spectator sport. Your vote is your voice.

Our local officials will have many big decisions to make in the next couple years, and we get to decide who will make them. That’s an awesome responsibility.

Plus, you’ll probably get one of those stickers. Who doesn’t love a good sticker?

This Article Warrants Your Attention

Simply Civics Brookline Town Hall

The Great American Town Meeting is small town government in all its glory.

Brookline has an upcoming Special Town Meeting scheduled for Tuesday, November 15th. 240 residents are elected to serve as Town Meeting Members (TMMs) to fulfill the town’s legislative duties. Each of the 16 precincts has 15 town meeting members, who are elected through staggered elections. Each year, 5 seats per precinct are up for election.

16 precincts x 15 seats = 240 Town Meeting Members

The Meeting of the Minds

They all convene at least once a year to balance the budget and vote on bylaws. The last Town Meeting was in May. At the Special Town Meeting in November, TMMs will address budget changes, plus take up both zoning and by-law amendments.

At Town Meeting, Members take up the “warrant,” a series of articles proposed by the Board of Selectmen or citizens. If I wanted to, I could propose a warrant. #CivicGoals.

The Life Cycle of a Warrant Article

I tend to think of Town Meeting Members as PhD candidates preparing their dissertations. Hear me out:

First, TMMs conduct a literature review. They see what’s out there in the local policy world, get familiar with the current research landscape, attend meetings, and talk with their neighbors. Then, they come up with an idea that seems to have traction.

They write up a proposal and submit it as a warrant article. They test it against the public through hearings. When it’s a complete and fully-vetted idea, they present their warrant (dissertation) at Town Meeting. Sometimes it’s accepted, and sometimes it’s not. If not, you can try again next year.

It’s no small feat.

But hey, local government is never dull.

Cars vs. Public Transit

Some warrant articles are more pertinent to some neighborhoods than others. I live in the Coolidge Corner SouthSide neighborhood of Brookline, and our Neighborhood Association has been particularly interested in Warrant Article #19. Here’s a summary:

Warrant Article 19 seeks to create a new “Transit Parking Overlay District” (TPOD) in order to reduce the minimum number of off-street parking spaces required for new residential development in areas of Brookline that are within a half-mile radius of an MBTA Green Line station.

Currently, in new residential developments in Brookline, each unit built must have 2 off-street parking spaces. The petitioner argues that if the units are close enough to public transportation, residents won’t necessarily need cars. With this article, developers could build new residential buildings without worrying about building massive underground parking garages.

There are pros and cons to this article, just like there are for others all around town.

If you’re interested in following Article 19 and contributing any comments, there are a few important upcoming hearings/meetings, prior to the Special Town Meeting:

  • The Planning Board on 10/13 (in a public hearing)
  • The Planning and Regulation subcommittee of the Advisory Committee on 10/19 (in a public hearing)
  • The full Advisory Committee on 10/26 (in a public meeting)
  • The Transportation Board (date TBD)

Taxes and Tobacco

There are 34 other warrant articles, covering a wide range of important issues to the town. Here are just a few topics:

  • Tobacco Control Regulations for Reducing Youth Access (4)
  • The Plastic Bag Ban (6)
  • The Emerald Island Special District (7 & 8)
  • Width of sidewalk at 25 Washington Street (11)
  • Electric Vehicle Charging Facilities (16)
  • Hubway Regional Bicycle Share Program (20)
  • Leaf Blowers (23) [a hot issue in Brookline- See the Moderator’s Committee on Leaf Blowers]
  • Online Posting of Police Reports (30)
  • Enhanced Brookline Tax Relief for Senior Homeowners with Modest Incomes (33)

Believe it or not, these warrant articles are the fiber of the local community. The Town Meeting process equips us to grow and adapt as a community.

Join the Conversation

My favorite part about local government is that it’s so easy to participate! You have the potential to affect public policy in your community. That is WILD!

There are many ways to get involved in Brookline’s Town Meeting.

  1. Town Meeting itself is open to the public, so mark your calendar for November 15th.
  2. If you can’t make it to Town Meeting, watch it from home! The kind folks at Brookline Interactive Group will be broadcasting it on Brookline Access Television.
  3. Contact your Town Meeting Members. If you’re a Brookline resident and you’re curious as to who your TMMs are, check out this handy list. Reach out to your TMMs and learn about what they see as the most pressing issues for your neighborhood.
  4. Get informed on the issues. The Brookline Neighborhood Alliance (the umbrella organization for neighborhood associations) typically hosts a warrant article forum. The upcoming forum is scheduled for November 10th at the Pierce School Auditorium.  Refreshments will be at 6:30 and the forum will be from 7:00PM-9:00PM.
  5. Submit comment at a hearing.
  6. Next year, consider submitting a warrant article.
  7. Lastly, you can even run as a Town Meeting Member!

Town Meeting isn’t just a Brookline phenomenon, but it happens to be very vibrant here. Each town runs Town Meeting in its own way, depending on the traditions and by-laws of the community. Cities have their own avenues for policy debate and public participation, too. Contact your City or Town Hall for more information.

As always, reach out to me with any questions.

How I Spend My Wednesday Evenings

There are two main reasons why I love living in this “college town”:

  1. I get to tailgate and cheer on the BC Football team each fall (Go eagles!); and
  2. There are tons of free lectures, events, and opportunities for intellectual growth.

This past Wednesday evening, my roommate, Brooke, and I ventured to our first class at Northeastern University. We found our way to West Village F, descended the stairs into the lecture hall, and pulled out our notebooks. I felt a deep nostalgia for that “first day of school” energy. The thing is, we’re not actually matriculated in a program at Northeastern.

The Choice: Election 2016

Each semester, Northeastern University hosts the Myra Kraft Open Classroom Series. It’s free and open to the public, and was established in memory of Myra Kraft. The course this semester is titled “The Choice: Election 2016.” It’s held on Wednesday evenings from 6:00PM-8:00PM in West Village F, Room 20. It started last Wednesday, September 7, and runs through December 7. Even if you missed the first class, you can still come!

The lead faculty is really what sold me on the class. Once I heard it, I thought, “YES! This is exactly how I want to spend my Wednesday evenings.” Here it is:

  • The Honorable Michael Dukakis, distinguished professor of Political Science at Northeastern University, former Governor of Massachusetts, 1988 Democratic nominee for President of the United States, and Brookline resident (For more info about Governor Dukakis, check out my recent post about the health policy forum in Brookline)
  • Christopher Bosso, professor of public policy and director of the Master of Public Policy at Northeastern University

Each week, there’s a panel of professors speaking on a different topic. The first hour of the first class was lecture. The second hour had a Q&A format.

What are the Choices?

As Professor Bosso explained last week,  the class is meant to be an exploration of the upcoming election. He introduced the course with a few guiding questions:

  • Where are we?
  • How did we get here?
  • What are the choices?
  • How do we look at the choices?

Clearly, this election season has been….different. Personally, I spend a lot of time thinking what it all means and what my role is in promoting a healthy democracy. The more I learn, the more questions I have. I hope this class will provide an academic framework to think productively, rather than emotionally, about the political reality today. Through this class, we’ll get to hear from experts in the field, and we’ll all unpack it together.

Up until November 8th, the class will focus on the election, candidates, and issues. After November 8th, we’ll study President Obama’s legacy.

Paths to the Nomination

Each week, there will be a panel of experts. Last Wednesday, we heard from Dr. Rachael Cobb, Associate Professor and Chair of the Suffolk University Department of Government, Dr. William Mayer, Professor of Political Science at Northeastern University, and Governor Dukakis.

First, Dr. Cobb taught us about the Democratic Party’s nomination process and how Hillary Clinton was nominated. Next, Dr. Mayer spoke about the Republican Party’s nomination process and how Donald Trump was nominated. Lastly, Governor Dukakis offered some reflections and observations about the nomination processes and why he thinks Americans overall are unhappy.

Among other topics, we learned about: the history of primaries in the U.S., the value of endorsements, the “invisible primary” (prior to the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary), the history of business people in politics, the consequences of unpopular party leadership, celebrities in politics, bias in press coverage, and candidate field size. Professor Cobb showed us some endorsement data from fivethirtyeight.com and Professor Mayer passed around a handout about, “Who Voted for Whom in the 2016 Republican Primaries.”

The Q&A session was interesting, too. Northeastern students and members of the broader public posed very insightful questions about third party candidates, political rhetoric, and unsuccessful candidates. It’s uplifting to witness other people, particularly young students, caring so much about the political process.

The Semester Ahead

As I’m writing this, I’m getting excited for class #2 tonight: The Economy, Jobs, and Opportunity. I wonder if political scientists are thinking differently about the economy than they were when I was in college a couple years ago. Next week will be about globalization and the age of migration. For a complete schedule and to read more about the topics and professors, check out this page.

I know that not all of my wonderful readers live in Brookline or Boston and can attend this lecture series. But, other colleges have classes that are open to the public as well. Visit your closest university’s course listing or calendar. There may be open lectures about the election. Moreover, there are a plethora of online free courses, through platforms like EdX. For one, Harvard has some free online classes about the election, which you can find here. If you find any good classes near you, let me know so I can share them with other readers.

This class seems very promising. I may be out of college, but I still get to spend my Wednesday evenings in class and my Saturdays watching football. Not too bad!

Unpacking Health Care Policy

Simply Civics

The Honorable Michael Dukakis

The third floor of the Brookline Senior Center was packed last Wednesday night. Brookliners gathered for the 20th Annual Public Health Policy Forum, presented by the Friends of Brookline Public Health and Brookline Adult & Community Education. The theme was: “Celebrating 20 Years of Advocating for Health Care Reform: Looking Back, Looking Forward.”

I barely found a seat!

The event began with welcoming remarks from the co-founders of Friends of Brookline Public Health: Alan Balsam, PhD, MPH, the Director of Brookline Public Health & Human Services; and J. Jacques Carter, MD.

Dr. Carter introduced the night’s moderator, the Honorable Michael Dukakis.

You may not know that former Governor Dukakis is a Brookline native. He started his public service career as a Brookline Town Meeting Member and was elected to the Massachusetts Legislature in 1962. He served three terms as Governor of Massachusetts, first from 1975-1979 and then again from 1983-1991. During that time, he was the Democratic Party nominee for President of the United States in the 1988 elections. And he’s from Brookline!

The panelists

I sat in awe as former Governor Dukakis introduced the panelists.  Each of the panelists has contributed so much to the field of public health through their respective careers.

  • Dr. Judy Ann Bigby served as the Commonwealth’s Secretary of Health and Human Services from 2007 to 2013. She was responsible for implementing many aspects of the 2006 health care reform law. She is currently a Senior Fellow with Mathematica Policy Research, located in Cambridge.
  • Amy Whitcomb Slemmer is the Executive Director of Health Care for All in Massachusetts. Health Care for All is a “nonprofit advocacy organization working to create a health care system that provides comprehensive, affordable, accessible, and culturally competent care to everyone, especially the most vulnerable among us.” (HCFA website).
  • Dolores Mitchell recently retired as Executive Director of the Group Insurance Commission after 29 years of service! The GIC provides health-related services to the Commonwealth’s employees, retirees and their dependents, municipalities, and other entities. Congratulations to Ms. Mitchell on her 29 years of service to the Commonwealth!
  • John McDonough is the Professor of Public Health Practice, Department of Health Policy & Management, at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He served as the Senior Advisor on National Health Reform to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. He worked on both the writing and passage of the Affordable Care Act.

As Governor Dukakis pointed out, three of the four panelists were women!

A brief health policy primer

Throughout the forum, the panelists discussed the dimensions of public health policy in recent years and the challenges that lie ahead.

In 2006, Massachusetts passed a health care reform bill guaranteeing coverage to most residents of the Commonwealth. As Dr. Bigby explained, 500,000 people gained insurance in 2006, many of whom had previously struggled the most to get health care.

Four years later, in 2010, President Obama and Congress passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Among other statutes, it mandated health insurance coverage for all Americans.

Where we are now

Today, many more Americans are insured. Consequently, fewer individuals find themselves financially bankrupted by medical crises. Plus, more Americans are receiving preventative medical care. Since 2010, Massachusetts has had the smallest increase in health care costs yet.

It’s not as simple as that, though. Mandated health insurance isn’t a one and done deal, and not everyone is in agreement about whether it’s the right solution.

The best way for us to develop informed opinions is through learning more about it. I’ll be the first to say my knowledge of the Affordable Care Act is just about a drop in the bucket of what the law entails. However, that’s one of the great aspects of attending an event like this. It exposed me to many aspects of health care reform, and then prompted me to do some more research on my own.

To learn more about the Affordable Care Act, check out the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website. It has the full text and a guide with key features of the law.

Costs

One of the pressing issues right now, the panelists explained, is figuring out how to reign in the costs of our complex health care system. Medication prices are going up, which means the cost of care is also increasing.

Rising health care costs affect everyone: consumers, families, health insurance companies, medical practices, and hospitals.

Leaders have proposed reform in this area, particularly at the state level. Massachusetts State Senator Mark Montigny (D) sponsored Senate Bill 1048, An Act to promote transparency and cost control of pharmaceutical drug prices. You can follow the bill’s progress here.

Participating in policy

Because we live in a democracy, we each have a say in the future of our health care system. In fact, we can participate in our national policy discussions.

It’s important for each of us to be informed and to communicate our views and ideas to our elected officials, both at the state and national level.

If you’re interested in following cost control initiatives at the state level, the legislature has a Joint Committee on Health Care Financing. You can track bills and attend hearings.

Lastly, be in touch with your elected officials! They want to hear from their constituents about where they stand. Massachusetts residents, you can find your state legislators here.

Looking ahead

We know that the health care system is complex. The participants, speakers, and panelists at the forum brought up issues that impact all of us, wherever we live across the city, country, or world.

However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t sustainable and high-quality solutions out there. If we think boldly, we can both support the world-class medical system in America and bring down costs.

I wonder what updates the panelists will share this time next year at the 21st Annual Public Health Policy Forum.

Ben & Jerry’s

Ben and Jerrys

I was listening to one of my favorite podcasts the other day, Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me. As it never fails to do, it got me thinking. I started wondering about how much politics and the news industry have changed with social media and technology. Has community life changed too? Do we engage civically in 2016 the same ways we did in 2006? 1996? 1986?

I’m willing to bet ten pints of Ben & Jerry’s Americone Dream that today in 2016, we can find new ways to build connectedness in our communities, nationwide, and globally.

And so, I’ve started this blog.

I’m writing about my civic adventures in Brookline and Boston, and I’m inviting you to join me wherever you are.

There are so many opportunities for civic engagement.

We can vote, support candidates, and run for office. We can read, watch, and follow the news. We can listen to podcasts.

We can attend town or city events, or meet our neighbors at block parties. We can read about our local history. We can serve fellow community members through soup kitchens and clothing drives. We can explore and clean our parks and public spaces.

We can debate and dream boldly with our friends, family, and strangers.

That’s just the beginning.

I’m going on a journey to discover the virtues and vulnerabilities of living fully in our democratic society. I’ll share my path, and I hope that together we’ll find limitless possibilities. Wherever you are in your career, schooling, or life, there is a way to exercise your role as a citizen.

Civic engagement is more than just voting. It’s being present and active in our communities.

I’m excited to begin. Will you join me?

I’d love any ideas so please feel free to leave comments or email me. We’ll see where this goes!