Listen & Learn

Simply Civics is back! This past fall, I started a new job (which I love!) and after spending a few months learning the ropes, I’m now ready to dive back into Simply Civics.

That said, I have been grappling with what Simply Civics should be now. There’s a different political context in place since I last wrote here. In response to the new political realities, we’ve seen a surge of activism. There are a ton of bloggers and specialists writing about activism, and I support their incredible work.

Consequently, I’m going to leave that to the people who know best. I think my role is going to be more about figuring out where civic engagement falls into all of this. What does civic engagement mean to us, and which ways can we each best contribute to our local communities?

Things like: how to run for local office or campaign for people whose ideas you support, how to decipher and track the issues that most impact you and your neighbors, when to attend local events that promote civic and productive dialogue, how to track your legislators’ work, which community organizations to support with your time, effort, and if applicable, financial resources, and how do the types of news we subscribe to affect how we think and act.

The goal for Simply Civics is to provide opportunities for individuals to engage in meaningful ways in their communities. You may have different interests, schedules, passions, priorities, and talents than I do. In fact, you probably do. Simply Civics is really about finding the ways you can best contribute to your community. I believe in this, in you, and in our capacity to build thriving, inclusive, civic-minded communities.

Ready?

There is one thing that I think each of us can do, no matter who we are, and I’m going to use my return post to explore this idea.

How can we be civic on a daily basis?

Listen to others.

It sounds corny, right? I don’t just mean to listen when someone is talking to you. We learned that with our “please” and “thank you.”

What I mean is: let’s actively seek out opportunities to listen. Ask about people’s experiences. Then listen. Think about how people’s experiences shape their views of their community — local and national. In order to create communities where everyone can thrive and feel included, we must listen.

I have been thinking a lot about the idea of allyship, of being an ally to others. I know that not everyone agrees with the term allyship, but for me it means intentional, authentic solidarity. Actual solidarity, not just superficial solidarity.

Code Switch

One of my favorite podcasts is NPR’s Code Switch: Race and Identity, Remixed. Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby, the hosts of the podcast, are two of my idols. They shed light on racial issues in everyday life in the most poignant, forward-thinking, and inclusive manner.

A couple weeks ago during my commute, I listened to an episode called, “Safety-Pin Solidarity: With Allies, Who Benefits?

I don’t want to give much away, because I highly encourage you listen to it. But one of my key takeaways was the notion that being an ally is not an identity, it’s a relationship.

Since through civic engagement, we build connection in our communities, I think it’s important to be incredibly aware of the relationships we build. When we are intentional about reaching out to people with different experiences than our own, to hear them out, we grow in our understanding of the complex challenges and strengths of our communities.

Safety Pin Box

I’ve been trying to educate myself about authentic allyship, and I’ve come across some really fascinating organizations and writers on the topic that I am excited to share.

First, in the same Code Switch episode, Shareen Marisol Meraji interviews Leslie Mac, the co-founder of Safety Pin Box. The Safety Pin Box is a subscription service designed to guide ally-ship to achieve racial justice. The website explains the process this way:

“Black women receive financial support. White people work to end white supremacy. Black people guide white ally work. White people learn to redirect resources and do racial justice personal development. All of this and more, every single month.”

Each month, subscribers receive a box with 3 guided ally tasks to complete within the month to jumpstart their active participation in the fight against structural injustice.

Safety Pin Box is a for-profit company, and the subscription fees go towards supporting black female activists. It seems like a really creative and tangible way to simultaneously support leaders of color and learn about racial justice.

Everyday Allyship

In addition to learning how to be an ally to people of color, I’ve also been thinking about other types of allyship.

I want to be more intentional about supporting businesses and media that are inclusive of all people, regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identification, language, or religion.

How can I personally be a better ally to: the LGBTQ community, immigrants and refugees, the members of my community who are English language learners, and to those who practice different faiths than my own?

This seems to be a really vast question, but the answers to it really, truly matter. I am challenging myself to be honest as I ask these and other questions about allyship, and open and responsive to the answers. I hope you’ll join me and the many others who are committed to learning about and living in authentic solidarity.

Never Stop Learning

If you’re also interested in learning more about allyship, here are some other resources:

There are a ton more; this isn’t even close to an exhaustive list. With that said, if you know of other good places to start, please share them with me via the Contact Me page so I can post about them. Thank you in advance!

To sum it all up, let’s: learn courageously, listen authentically, think boldly, and act civically.

I feel optimistic about the future of civic engagement in our communities.

3 Civic Things To Do Today

Today will be chock full of civic opportunities, and here’s why:

  1. It’s the last day to register to vote in the November 8th election.
  2. The League of Women Voters of Brookline is hosting a Ballot Question Forum tonight at the Brookline Main Branch Library.
  3. The final presidential debate is tonight.

Voter Registration

If there’s one thing you gather from this post, I hope it’s this: make sure you’re registered to vote. We wouldn’t want you to get to the polls on November 8th and find out that you’re not on the books. To confirm your voter registration status, check out this handy tool on the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s site.

Today is the very last day to register in Massachusetts to be eligible to vote on November 8th. That said, here’s the online form. Alternatively, if you don’t have a Massachusetts driver’s license, learner’s permit, or RMV non-driver ID, head on over to your City or Town Hall this afternoon.

Once you’re all set, check with your family members, friends, colleagues, and other people in your life to make sure they’ve registered, too. If they’ve changed addresses recently, have them look up their voter registration status.

Exercise your civic duty by assisting others with theirs.

Ballot Question Forum

Next, there will be 4 ballot questions this November in Massachusetts. You can read the full ballot question text here. Briefly, here are the topics:

  1. Expanded Slot-Machine Gaming
  2. Charter School Expansion
  3. Conditions for Farm Animals
  4. Legalization, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana

Do some research ahead of time so you can make informed decisions on November 8th. One way to get informed is by attending the League of Women Voters’ Ballot Forum tonight! Here are the details:

Speaker Mary Ann Ashton, Voter Service Chair of the League of Women Voters of Massachusetts, will present both sides of the ballot questions with an open discussion. The event is free and open to all.

Where: Hunneman Hall, Brookline Library, 361 Washington Street, Brookline

When: October 19, 2016, Refreshments at 6 pm, Program at 6:30 pm

We’ll conclude with plenty of time for you to get ready for the debate tonight.

Final Presidential Debate

Lastly, tonight is the final presidential debate. Coverage starts at 8:30PM and the debate kicks off at 9:00PM. If you don’t have cable, there are plenty of ways to watch it online.

The League of Women Voters has a debate watching kit to help us get the most out of our debate-watching experience.

Furthermore, the NPR Politics Podcast team will be live tweeting their fact checking throughout the debate. They’ll also release a new podcast afterwards with debate analysis. I find their podcasts extremely informative and easy to listen to. I highly recommend you subscribe, because they’ll be releasing podcasts every day for the whole week leading up to the election.

Have a wonderful, civics-filled Wednesday!

Freakonomics & Why We Follow the News

I listen to NPR One regularly…probably daily. If you haven’t checked it out already, download it from your App store. It’s an audio app that streams NPR news and programs based on your interests. I hear newscast clips from the Boston area and programs from across the country. If you hear one you don’t like, you can skip it. It’s similar to Pandora in that way. To be honest though, I don’t think I’ve skipped anything before. It’s that good.

I stumbled upon an interesting Freakonomics Radio rebroadcast the other day, called  Why Do We Really Follow the News?

Do we follow the news because we find it entertaining? We enjoy following sports, music, arts, fashion, etc, in the news. I personally find the Today Show entertaining. That’s not really what the podcast is getting at though.

I would argue that following the news, particularly when it comes to politics and the community, is not about entertainment. We grow through connecting with others. We feel compassion for others. We want to be informed of what’s going on down the street from us, and across the world from us, because it matters to us. When we’re more informed, and when we can relate to others through news, we thrive together in our local, national, and global communities.

Listen to the episode and let me know what you think!